A Cultural Journal

    Hum Hain Kuch Khaas

    - Posted on: April 05, 2013 | Post your comment here Comments

    Google Translation: اُردو | 中文

    Hum Hain Kuch Khaas

    2 April 2013, the sixth annual World Autism Awareness Day, a global event that goes mostly unnoticed in Pakistan. This year, Kuch Khaas provided a platform for sharing the stories, experiences and needs of the autistic community in the country under the banner “Hum Hain Kuch Khaas”.

    “Hum Hain Kuch Khaas” is a networking event held by Kuch Khaas first Tuesday of every month to promote and encourage individuals or organizations striving to make positive change in society.  The hope is to connect these philanthropic organizations with other people who share similar ambitions and goals.

    The first speaker at the event, Saadia Oberai Khan, a young mother with an autistic son shared her personal story.  She explicated basic facts about autism and its affects on an individual, and urged the audience to view autism not as an ‘abnormality’, but an intellectual disability, that can be accepted in society if only we open our arms and accept people who are different from us.

    Based on the same theme Mr. Ahmad Hassan, the founder of Hassan Academy, narrated his story of sharing his home and space with special needs children. His hope, to connect the special needs children with other ‘normal children’, so that one day the deaf and the dumb too will be considered “normal’ citizens of this country.

    The platform also included the young voices from “You-Help Us”. A young man, in a gray suit related his account of watching his world crumble after the 2005 earthquake, and the need felt by him and his friends for collective action in not only helping others, but also teaching and raising awareness about how members of society can respect one another.

    “Hum Hain Kuch Khaas” is a reminder that in a country where so many things are forgotten and so many people ignored, there is a wave of change coming and we, the people of Pakistan, can be part of the change.

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